Maputo Corridor Logistics Initiative - 10th Anniversary Review & Membership Directory - page 9

Inside MCLI
prove enormously beneficial for MCLI’s members, deepening and
enriching the existing relationships and furthering regional
integration.
“A PPP will allow us to drive projects and studies,” says
Mommen. “So if a company wanted to set up a transport business
we could advise on every aspect, connecting the producer with
the end market using the very latest information. And we would
be a driver of that information rather than just a passive
recipient.”
Turning the tables
MCLI is in the process of looking at the various templates
available for a would-be PPP. “The trick of becoming an effective
PPP is to really define the role so that the private sector voice
doesn’t get lost,” informs Mommen.
While the exact format of the PPP isn’t yet known, there are
many good examples to follow. MCLI’s challenge is to extrapolate
the information available to its unique situation. As it stands,
there is no other organisation like MCLI in Africa so whatever the
final outcome, MCLI will be blazing a trail.
One idea is to establish Memorandums of Understanding
(MoUs) with the three relevant governments – Mozambique,
South Africa and Swaziland. The basis for this strategy is already
in place as SADC has established a Transport Protocol that
provides a good framework for progress. The three governments
would be asked to contribute funds on an equitable basis.
In effect, this is turning the tables. Previously, the private sector
funded MCLI and the government reaped the benefits from
enhanced trade links and a positive economic return. Now, it is
the government’s turn to invest to bring some much-needed
impetus to the private sector.
“A PPP will also make us truly accountable,” adds Mommen.
“We have always been transparent but this adds another layer of
certainty to our member benefits. People will be able to see what
we are doing and in turn being a PPP will allow us to bring others
to account.”
One suggestion going forward is to make MCLI responsible for
all agreements affecting the Maputo Corridor. This would enable
MCLI to be far more proactive, giving the organisation increased
traction and a long-term mission. Although it seems
contradictory, securing government funding and taking on a
semi-governmental structure would actually give MCLI greater
freedom to bring about effective improvements to the corridor.
“We can’t keep going to our members with cap in hand for
more money,” Mommen states. “It dilutes our effectiveness. If we
are to provide the highest standards of service to our members,
we need independence and the ability to react quickly to market
requirements.”
Previously, the private sector funded
MCLI and the government reaped the
benefits from enhanced trade links and
a positive economic return. Now, it is the
government’s turn to invest to bring
some much-needed impetus to the
private sector.
9
Maputo Corridor Logistics Initiative
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